At its new South of Fifth location, 101 Washington Avenue, TiramesU, the 25-year old South Beach landmark restaurant, has doubled its menu, still serving authentic Italian dishes while adding an assortment of fresh pastas, including old favorites like the Vongole, risottos and daily specials. Chef Pintus brings familiar flavors to the next level creating specials that feature fresh seasonal produce and imported ingredients such as the Fontina cheese.

Additionally, a $20 daily lunch special (choice of appetizer, entrée and dessert) makes for the perfect dining spot for busy professionals. And starting in April (until October), every Tuesday, TiramesU will offer any of its bottles of wine at 50% off, a weekly occasion to indulge in one’s expansive taste or try different wines.

With Valeria Longoni as the managing owner and Executive Chef Fabrizio Pintus at the helm of the kitchen, the new location has a focus on perfectly executed creations from traditional to more modern takes.

Details about the menu:

Chef Fabrizio Pintus continues to produce Italian fare to satisfy the most diligent of palettes while bringing some exciting techniques and flavor combinations for diners to enjoy as specials.

Appetizers touch on the full spectrum of Italy’s regional gastronomy from Mediterranean with the Polpo – octopus, potatoes, crispy speck and salsa verde – to Northern region with the Vitello Tonnato – thinly sliced overnight roasted veal with a tuna sauce, always incorporating local seasonal produce. In addition, a special selection of cheese plates such as Pecorino Sardo, Rosso di Langa and Taleggio is available.

The Primi Piatti section offers house-made fresh pastas. Traditional sauces such as the Bolognese, Vongole and Melanzana are classically made while creative highlights include the Kale Fettucine with Rabbit Ragout, the Stracci Pasta with Wild Boar Ragout, and the blue potato gnocchi with cheese fonduta and grana padano. The Pappardelle is gluten-free and dressed with San Marzano tomato sauce and basil. All fruits and vegetables are sourced locally and seasonally.

As Secondi Piatti the menu showcases duck, Australian lamb chops, Sterling Silver beef tenderloin, Scottish salmon, Mediterranean seabass and a catch of the day.  Each dish creates a harmonious combination of savory, sweet and very distinctive flavors. For example, the Branzinois accompanied by saffron cauliflower and the Anatra, the honey duck breast, is served with apple puree and braised kale. Meanwhile the Anatra’s duck is honey-glazed and served with apple puree and chargrilled kale, the Agnello (lamb chops) with blue smashed potatoes and blueberry, and the Salmone with red beets and sour cream. The side dish selection offers lean yet flavorful options such as grilled asparagus with pecorino sardo and crispy speck and anInsalata di Pomodoro with organic tomatoes, onions and e.v.o.o.

The Dolci showcases three tiramisu choices including a trio sampling dish. Flavors consist of strawberry, espresso, chocolate and red pepper, and mixed berries. In addition, the menu offers a house-made Panna Cotta with vanilla, honey and pistachio, a Sgroppino, squid ink sorbet with limoncello and prosecco, and a Semifreddo, a semi-frozen cassata with ricotta cheese, candied fruit topped with blood orange sauce.

About the bar:

The contemporary wrap-around dark grey quartz bar with mirrored shelves welcomes patrons upon entering the restaurant. The cocktail list is short but thoughtful with flavors that play on traditional concoctions with an Italian twist.

The Fighting for the Flag, made with tequila but also cocchi Americano, a typically Italian aperitif wine used as vermouth, incorporates a piece of history: back in the early 1900’s, Italy’s and Mexico’s flags were confusingly similar and international naval authorities had to settle the minor political dispute.

Princess Elena, made with Amaro Montenegro, lemon juice and prosecco, is also part of Italy’s history. She, whose full name is Princess Elena Petrovic-Njegos of Montenegro, was the one after whom the Amaro Montenegro liquor was named as she married King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy known for indulging in this liquor.

TiramesU’s libation list also offers less history-heavy options such as the Fizz 101 made withCocchi rose, prosecco and soda, and the Sage Old Fashion with basil hayden bourbon, sage and Amaro Averna, for example.

And lighter, sunshine-friendly cocktails include the Heart Beet, pineapple-infused Effen vodka with fresh beets, orange and lime, as well as the Caribbean Lust with Pyrat rum, jalapeno, mint, passion fruit, lime juice and agave.

About the décor:

Francesco Fregonese, Italian interior designer, envisioned a space with rooted connections to the 25-year-old restaurant brand infused with a breath of contemporary.   The traditional blue, constant throughout TiramesU’s history remains not only in the logo but in the window treatment which also evokes the ocean waves, a nod to the new location’s proximity to the ocean.

The beige walls, tables and dark grey quartz bar continue the subtle salute to the beach. They exude a calm warmth while the bronze details on the pendant lights add an eye-catching sparkle. Most of the photographic canvases that hung in the Lincoln Road location for 17 years will now welcome patrons at the new TiramesU. The twist is: they have been carefully “embedded into the wall” by using a special painting technique. The end result is a softened and “trompe l’oeil” version of the images.

The antique metal light appliques were kept from the original TiramesU location and are from the 1930’s Orient Express train. The blue detail of the lights signaled occupancy when lit. Aside from their aesthetically interesting design, they also carry a strong component of the motherland beyond the food. Meanwhile, the elegant chandeliers and candelabras educe from Elie Saab’s simply elegant lines and amazing attention to details upgrade the ambiance to 2015.

The simple and unassuming design and color palette emphasize the true protagonist of TiramesU’s story: the food.

TiramesU

TiramesU opened its doors in 1988 on the corner of Ocean Drive and 5th Street. The Fregonese family, from Treviso, Italy, believed Miami needed an authentic Italian restaurant where one could find homemade pastas and traditional dishes such as the saffron risotto and the Branzino. The concept was very well received experiencing early success and outgrowing its space. In 1997, TiramesU relocated to 721 Lincoln Road, a then emerging pedestrian-friendly street in the heart of Miami Beach. The 75-seat new location in South of Fifth at 101 Washington Avenue is under new ownership with Valeria Longoni as managing owner.